nepal

Pokhara

We had just met our half way mark when we travelled to Pokhara (apparently on one of the worst roads in the world, but we thought it was a breeze compared to some of the roads we'd been on in India)! At half way, we indulged in a few comforts, and Pokhara had plenty of comforts on offer. It was quite obviously a tourist town (we weren't surprised by this), but it is something we once turned up our noses at a little. But at this stage of our journey, we didn't at all mind the lakeside restaurants, the flippin good coffee at the cafe next door, or the mini mart across the road. 

 

Photos by Ben Journee

Phewa Tal (Phewa Lake)

Phewa Tal (Phewa Lake)

Temple on a small island on the lake

Temple on a small island on the lake

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Bunnies at our guesthouse. They became our friends and we were a little sad to say goodbye to them.

Bunnies at our guesthouse. They became our friends and we were a little sad to say goodbye to them.

Only rowboats (no motors) on the lake meant it was wonderfully quiet.

Only rowboats (no motors) on the lake meant it was wonderfully quiet.

 We enjoyed being out doors too! Taking the 'scenic route' walk up to the World Peace Pagoda was an adventure, which included getting a little lost in the forest, leeches (which were fucking foul), and even a far too large snake (also foul). We spent a lot of time on the lake, including hiring a boat for the whole day, pulling up across the lake for lunch, and reading in the middle of the lake in utter peace and quiet with the mountains in the background (just). And we went for a bike ride around the northern end of the lake as well, on the bumpiest road you can imagine. This resulted in a couple of 'John Wayne' walks for the next couple of days.

Footbridge to the start of the Pagoda track

Footbridge to the start of the Pagoda track

This was the clear part of the track

This was the clear part of the track

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World Peace Pagoda (built by the same Japanese Buddhist who built Shanti Stupa in Leh)

World Peace Pagoda (built by the same Japanese Buddhist who built Shanti Stupa in Leh)

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View of Phewa Tal from the World Peace Pagoda

View of Phewa Tal from the World Peace Pagoda

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 The trip up to Sarangkot (viewpoint for the Himalayas) was breathtaking. We chose a perfect, clear morning and the sacred peak of Machhapuchare (Fish Tail) turned on all its glory.

View from Sarangkot lookout

View from Sarangkot lookout

The Himalayas extending into forever

The Himalayas extending into forever

Machhapuchare (Fish Tail)

Machhapuchare (Fish Tail)

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We walked past these kids playing on the way back down the hill

We walked past these kids playing on the way back down the hill

Nepal felt a little bit like a halfway point, which is what it was. It felt like a holiday. It was easy, a little indulgent, and totally relaxing. It was a wonderful place to transition from India, into the beginning of our second half.  

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Sunset over Phewa Lake

Sunset over Phewa Lake

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Kathmandu

Ours was a pleasant first impression of the subcontinent’s small neighbour. Crossing the border around 9pm (after a ten hour journey in the back of a jeep), we were given a friendly welcome, which we appreciated all the more because our parting gift from India was to be somewhat cheated on our trip out of the country (the jeep was supposed to be a tourist bus, and trust us, it makes a massive difference). 

Our first impressions were not to be broken. We have found Nepal to be a remarkably easy place to travel, full of home comforts that we’ve appreciated at our half way mark. We have found the Nepalese friendly, the bargaining has been relaxed, and we’ve actually experienced customer service! How different. The food is similar to India, the fashion is similar (though with a funkier western-dressed younger generation), the language too bled seamlessly into one another. And yet, in other ways it couldn’t be more different, and for us, the change was met with a couple of smiles, and some deep, relaxed breaths.

 

Photos by Ben Journee

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We began our time in Kathmandu with the walking tour offered by Lonely Planet, a common thing to do we found out, as we seemed to follow another couple who similarly had their guide book out.

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We would have to recommend the walking tours, as they allow you to explore the hidden alleyways and courtyards without getting dismally lost, or navigate the overwhelmingly busy market, and they also draw your attention to special details that you would otherwise not notice or fully appreciate. For example, the small 9th or 10th century Buddha sculpture, tilting slightly, that sits beneath the entrance to a dentist and beside an old television store. Another gem was being pointed out the large chunk of wood that has been covered with thousands of coins, nailed on as offerings to the toothache god.

Small Buddha relief next to the television shop

Small Buddha relief next to the television shop

Coin covered log for the toothache god

Coin covered log for the toothache god

Kathmandu’s streets are layered in history. Centuries old buildings now house contemporary stores, historical temple steps are used as platforms for people to sell their wares, and various deity sculptures are layered thick with bright red and orange paste which has been applied in worship for generations.

Ganesh was a super popular deity around Kathmandu

Ganesh was a super popular deity around Kathmandu

Another Ganesh

Another Ganesh

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Apparently this old building owns the oldest windows in Kathmandu 

Apparently this old building owns the oldest windows in Kathmandu 

We loved the many stores in the basements of historic buildings!

We loved the many stores in the basements of historic buildings!

How could we not? 

How could we not? 

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A spice seller at the busy chowk (sqaure) called Asan Tole. We wish the image could capture the smell too!

A spice seller at the busy chowk (sqaure) called Asan Tole. We wish the image could capture the smell too!

Dried fish stall

Dried fish stall

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Many of the temples we visited were open courtyards, filled rather irregularly with small statues, stupas and shrines, and almost always, there was a magnificent (and inspiring) blend of Buddhist and Hindu figures and symbolism, which reveals a religious philosophy that is open, layered and malleable.

 

Seto Machhendranath Temple

Seto Machhendranath Temple

Feeding grain to the pigeons helps to boost your karma

Feeding grain to the pigeons helps to boost your karma

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Itum Bahal courtyard 

Itum Bahal courtyard 

Kathesimbhu Stupa

Kathesimbhu Stupa

 Kathmandu’s Durbar Square is a palace complex, packed with temples and courtyards. An interesting palace was the Kumari Bahal, a striking courtyard-centred building of burnt orange brick and black wooden carvings, and home to the Kumari. The Kumari Devi is a living goddess, a young girl who is believed to be an incarnation of the goddess Taleju (Durga). Once a day she stands at her window for onlookers to admire her. Her reign ends at the event of her first period, at which time the young girl converts back to 'normal' life, and the search begins for the next living goddess. 

Kumari Bahal courtyard

Kumari Bahal courtyard

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Souvenir stalls in Durbar Square

Souvenir stalls in Durbar Square

Temples of Durbar Sqare

Temples of Durbar Sqare

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Sculpture of Bhairav (Shiva in his destructive manifestation) 

Sculpture of Bhairav (Shiva in his destructive manifestation) 

A large stone inscription to the goddess Kalika written in 15 languages. The spout in the middle of the wall will apparently flow with milk if someone can decipher them all.

A large stone inscription to the goddess Kalika written in 15 languages. The spout in the middle of the wall will apparently flow with milk if someone can decipher them all.

A shrine that has been crushed by a tree

A shrine that has been crushed by a tree

The busy and extremely congested market of Kel Tole

The busy and extremely congested market of Kel Tole

Again, how could we not?

Again, how could we not?

We visited Bodnath (or Boudha, or Boudhanath) which is the largest stupa in Asia. We circumambulated (walked clockwise around) the massive structure a number of times in the drizzling rain, and enjoyed a coffee overlooking the rather charming, slow paced and quiet courtyard and watching other pilgrims on their journey around the monumental stupa.

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Butter lamps

Butter lamps

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Swayambunath (also known as the Monkey Temple) was a joyous fusion of Buddhist and Hindu iconography. The large stupa that dominates the courtyard is the first thing one sees after the ladder-like climb. The courtyard is full of smaller shrines, stupas and temples, it's dotted with souvenir shops and a couple of cafes, and the full, musty smell of incense and butter lamps hangs in the air.  

Mani wall at the bottom of the staircase

Mani wall at the bottom of the staircase

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Patan is now essentially a suburb of Kathmandu, but was once a kingdom of its own along with Kathmandu and Bhaktapur, each of which has their own Durbar Square. The streets of Patan were similarly as layered and interesting as Kathmandu. Apparently stumbling across some festival celebrations, we followed crowds of people through a few major, lively and beautiful temples. And we may have got slightly abreast of Lonely Planet's instructions as we attempted the maze-like walk through low-roofed passages that connected numerous courtyards. But we found our way in the end.

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A 600 year old stupa that was damaged in 1367 by Muslim invaders

A 600 year old stupa that was damaged in 1367 by Muslim invaders

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Golden Temple

Golden Temple

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Patan's Durbar Square

Patan's Durbar Square

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One of the dark alleyways between courtyards

One of the dark alleyways between courtyards

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